Young Market Researcher Winners: A New Era in Qualitative Research


Melanie Rankin

Melanie Rankin

Author Bio

Melanie Rankin became Research Manager at B2B International after rising through the ranks from telephone interviewer in only a short space of time. Mel attended Sheffield Hallam University where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science. She works closely with B2B market research organizations, managing some of the company’s biggest and most demanding clients.


Author Bio

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At one time the phrase “qualitative research” would conjure up images of a group of people huddled round a table with a team of researchers and clients scribbling down notes behind a mirror. But not anymore! With business-to-business (B2B) research buyers wanting more than ever from research, it’s imperative that we keep innovating. Below are just a few examples of how you can stay ahead of the game.

 

 

 

The Rise of Online

Working primarily with B2B markets, it can be struggle to find enough of your target market in one location. With the smartphone becoming a staple for consumers and business men/women alike, the possibilities for qual research have opened up; whether it be online focus groups, online communities or even digital/self-ethnography. 

We now have the ability to cast the net further and reach, what can often be, a small number of B2B decision makers.

Marrying Psychology & Qual 

Qualitative research has its roots in academia and social research. More than often than not qualitative researchers forget the importance of understanding the psychology of why people act and react the way they do.

Psychology is the study of the human mind and behavior; which when used in qualitative research can help to understand and explain how we think, act and feel. Marrying the two together in the right way can bring a depth of insight to your work that wasn’t previously possible.

Pushing the Boundaries

For years researchers have conducted traditional face-to-face focus groups that last 90 minutes, always 90 minutes. My question to you (and previously my colleagues!) is – why does it have to be 90 minutes?

The answer to that question is it doesn’t. It may be the ‘norm’ but don’t be afraid to suggest 2 or even 3 hour focus groups if that’s how long it will take. In fact, the longer you have your participants in the room, the safer they will feel and in return you will reach deeper insights.

 

Melanie Rankin is one the winners of Confirmit’s 20 Young Market Researcher Awards. She is currently a Research Manager at B2B International.

 

Icons designed by Alfredo Hernandez, Freepik & Pixel Buddha from www.flaticon.com

 

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